Louisiana workers like you often repeat the same motions every day. If you are a secretary, this may include typing or using a mouse. If you are an assembly line worker, it may include operating various machinery. As a cashier, it may involve scanning items at the checkout.

Whatever the case, the human body is not made to do the same thing day in and out. You may suffer from repetitive stress injuries if you do this. Carpal tunnel syndrome is one possible injury.

Repetitive stress injuries at work

Mayo Clinic examines carpal tunnel syndrome, a type of repetitive stress injury. You may not know how serious carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is. Some workers mistakenly believe that you can “power through” the pain of CTS. This is not true. CTS is an intensive condition that needs rest for the possibility of recovery. In some cases, even rest is not enough. Severe cases of CTS needs a specialized type of surgery to fix the affected area.

CTS and a lengthy healing process

As you can tell, this level of CTS is disruptive to your daily life. It is also disruptive to your ability to work. If the repetitive motion caused CTS, you cannot repeat it while you are in recovery. For you, this may mean that you cannot do your job. You may have the ability to take some paid time off of work. But often, CTS needs weeks or even months of recovery time. As a worker, this is not always realistic. This is also why many workers in your position pursue compensation. After all, repetitive stress injuries are a result of the job and often inadequate breaks.