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Should drivers worry about drowsiness?

On Behalf of | Feb 11, 2022 | Blog, Car Accidents

Drivers have a lot on their plate when it comes to safety. One wrong move could potentially result in a crash that can cause serious injury or even death, so it is important for drivers to know their limits and understand sources of danger.

For example, even the state of a driver’s wakefulness could affect the frequency of crashes. Drowsy driving serves as a huge potential danger.

The impact of drowsiness

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration looks into the impact of drowsiness on driver safety. Drowsiness can impact the body in a way similar to intoxication. It slows the body’s reflexes and speed, reduces agility, and decreases mobility and dexterity.

Mentally, it can cause confusion and cloudiness, along with completely disrupting concentration and focus. Drivers who struggle with sleep deprivation also often have trouble spotting danger in advance or reacting to risks as they appear.

Why do so many people do it?

On top of that, many drivers hit the road without getting enough sleep. It is such a commonplace issue because society does not treat drowsy driving as it treats intoxicated driving, or even other forms of distracted driving such as texting while behind the wheel.

Even though sleep deprivation proves just as hazardous, people often feel they can get away with it simply because they have done it before with no consequences. Unfortunately, it only takes one time for things to go irreversibly wrong, even if a driver does everything right hundreds of other times. For this reason, drivers should understand the true risk they put themselves and other motorists into when they hit the road without sleeping enough.

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