Our client was an 83 year old woman who was admitted to a nursing home to receive the adequate care and treatment that she needed. Upon her admission to the nursing home, she was identified as being high risk for falls. She was unable to stand on her own, and the staff was required to use a mechanical lift to safely transfer her. She was unable to maintain a safe upright position in a wheelchair without leaning forward and falling over. Our client sustained a fall because the nursing staff chose not to implement standard nursing interventions to reduce her risk of falling and becoming injured.

Two versions of the story emerge as to how our client fell. The family of our client believed that she was dropped by the nursing staff as she was being transferred from her bed to her wheelchair. This occurred because the nursing staff chose not to use the required mechanical lift to transfer our client. She was then taken to the morning church service, but had to leave the service early because she was in such excruciating pain. The nursing home facility, on the other hand, claims that after she was wheeled to her room from the church service. She was left in her wheelchair and fell from her chair. In either case, the nursing staff did not follow proper nursing protocols and procedures for maintaining patient safety and preventing falls.

After her fall, she was taken to the hospital to be evaluated for her injury. Radiology studies at the hospital revealed that our client had suffered a left femoral shaft fracture and a left supracondylar fracture. These fractures required surgical intervention and traction for pain relief. After the surgery, she was admitted back to the nursing home. Our client’s risk assessment at the nursing home indicated that she was at a high risk for the development of decubitus ulcers. Despite her risk factors being noted, the nursing home did not properly turn and reposition our client. This led to the development and progression of multiple decubitus ulcers, including one stage II bed sore on her buttocks.

Our client suffered in pain from her femoral shaft fractures and decutitus ulcers until her death nine months after the initial accident. Her early and untimely death was related to the negligent care and treatment of our client by the nursing home staff. Todd Townsley was able to settle this woman’s claim with the nursing home and the Patient’s Compensation Fund for a satisfactory sum.